Beekeeping Tasks By Month

JANUARY

  • Check hive entrances clear/predator damage
  • Oxalic/lactic acid treatment for Varroa
  • Heft to check stores

FEBRUARY

  • Check stores/emergency feeding
  • Check hive entrances clear/predator damage
  • Oxalic/lactic acid treatment for Varroa
  • Prepare new frames of foundation

MARCH

  • Check stores/emergency feeding
  • Hive Records -Get the new sheets/book all ready
  • Replacing brood boxes/floors/queen excluders – and general cleaning up.
  • Varroa monitoring – and treatment with apiguard or similar
  • First inspection?  Only if it’s warm and not too windy (+/- 13C)
  • Queen clipping and marking – only if warm enough

APRIL

  • Regular hive inspections.   Check for:-  queen;  space; stores; swarming; disease
  • Easing old frames to edges for replacement
  • Varroa monitoring – and treatment before first supers in place
  • Super in plenty of time early in the season

MAY

  • Supering – add another when bees are on 75% of frames
  • Remove and extract rape honey as soon as ripe
  • Weekly inspections – Look closely for queen cells
  • Have equipment for artificial swarming ready
  • Monitoring Varroa

JUNE

  • Beware of food shortage after taking honey
  • Monitor and treat for Varroa (non-chemical with supers on)
  • Full disease inspection
  • Weekly inspections – Look closely for queen cells

JULY

  • Still supering and extracting
  • Reduce entrances vs wasps and robbers

AUGUST

  • Finish honey removal
  • Full disease inspection
  • Varroa treatment – apiguard or similar
  • Clean supers for storage
  • Unite small colonies

SEPTEMBER

  • Estimate stores and feed syrup for winter
  • Remove varroa treatments

OCTOBER

  • Ensure ventilation
  • Check enough feed
  • Fit mouse guards and woodpecker nets
  • Sort and clean spare equipment for storage
  • Monitor varroa drop

NOVEMBER

  • Check entrances are clear
  • Sterilise and mend stored equipment

 DECEMBER

  • Check hive entrances clear/predator damage
  • Oxalic/lactic acid treatment for Varroa

8 thoughts on “Beekeeping Tasks By Month

  1. I don’t know whether it’s just me or if perhaps everyone else encountering problems with your site.
    It looks like some of the text on your posts are running off the screen. Can someone else please
    provide feedback and let me know if this is happening to them too?
    This could be a issue with my browser because I’ve
    had this happen before. Kudos

  2. I like your beekeeper’s tasks calendar
    I use something similar as a calendar of apiculture focusing
    I have been hobby beekeeping seriously since 1969.
    Wintering 2 colonies side by side with 2 inch styrofoam boxes coverings I found the bees can manage the microclimate very effectively at – 20 to – 31 celcius
    Would like to follow your regional apiculture exploites Can text more in a text message or email and share some photos. My 32 colonies have an average of 10 to 40 inches of snow and yes bees that have servered their time take a death flight. Bee well Your beefriend ken. Cloverleaf Manitoba Canada

  3. Thanks a lot for this! The months are a bit different here in Australia but this is going to help with some of the workshops I have coming up. Our Spring has just started a few weeks ago and I have all my workshops lined up for Spring and Summer.
    I have a similar list as well for one of them but not as extensive, so will be adding to that. Thanks again!

    1. Thanks so much for the note In the Heartland of Canada we are into fall prep for winter with our last treatments for mites and feed

      Temperatures are in the 20’s C during the day and down to 4-8 C at night

      I definitely like the events listing and will utilize for our Red River Apiarists Association meetings that are becoming more workshop like.

      I am about to write up out October newsletter

      Appreciate this connect Bee Well Your beefriend Ken

      On Sat, Oct 1, 2016 at 5:20 AM Essex Beekeepers’ Association wrote:

      > Rebecca commented: “Thanks a lot for this! The months are a bit different > here in Australia but this is going to help with some of the workshops I > have coming up. Our Spring has just started a few weeks ago and I have all > my workshops lined up for Spring and Summer. I have ” >

    2. Hi there I am curious to know what you mean by replacing brood? Is this for splits, expansion or a parasite control manipulation? I have placed my colonies side by side on 1.5 inch high density styrofoam and am treating with a low dose of comic (20 mls.) because mites are below threshold numbers. Because winters here are -20s to -40 C I cover hives with an inner cover then a 2 inch high density styrofoam box cover with a black 6 ml poly.

      Bee well. Ken

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